WHICH PRES WAS A STAND-UP COMIC?

A Stint in Las Vegas

Ronald ReaganLike other movie actors, Ronald Reagan saw his acting career begin to slump in the ’50s.  Fewer and fewer movie roles were coming his way, and many actors were turning to television.  Although a critic of television, Reagan was to follow this route, too.  But first, in 1954 he took a gig as a Las Vegas stand-up comic for a few weeks.  He also was a Master of Ceremonies, announcing a singing quartet, “The Continentals.”  Later that same year Reagan got a break. He landed a job as host of a weekly TV drama series, GE Electric Theater. The former movie actor joined the ranks of TV performers.  Unpredictably, his position with General Electric was to lead him into politics.

Part of his responsibility was to tour the United States as a pubic relations representative for GE, seeking out workers’ opinions. In making celebrity appearances at GE plants  he received a “political education.” During this time he switched his views from liberal to conservative and began speaking out against government regulation and wasteful spending. As it turned out, the job he probably would not have accepted if his acting career had still been on track proved to be an excellent training ground for this future role as president.

The nine most terrifying words in the English language are: “I’m from the government and I’m here to help.” — Ronald Reagan

 

 

HARRY SAID IT!

can't_stand_heatPMMORE HARRY S. TRUMAN QUOTES:

♦ You want a friend in Washington? Get a dog.

♦   If you can’t convince them, confuse them.

♦   When even one American — who has done nothing wrong — is forced by fear to shut his mind and close his mouth — then all Americans are in peril.

♦  A pessimist is one who makes difficulties of his opportunities and an optimist is one who makes opportunities of his difficulties.

♦  I never gave anybody hell. I just told the truth and they thought it was hell.

♦  The reward of suffering is experience.

♦  The buck stops here!

♦  There is nothing new in the world except the history you do not know.

♦  Always be sincere, even if you don’t mean it.

♦  The best way to give advice to your children is to find out what they want and then advise them to do it.

♦  The President is always abused. If he isn’t, he isn’t doing anything.

♦  Being too good is apt to be uninteresting.

♦  A politician is a man who understands government. A statesman is a politician who’s been dead for 15 years.

 

 

 

TAFT SAID IT . . .

William Taft advice2 More William Howard Taft Quotes:

♦  The trouble with me is that I like to talk too much.

♦   A government is for the benefit of all the people.

♦   The world is not going to be saved by legislation.

♦  Enthusiasm for a cause sometimes warps judgment.

♦  We are all imperfect. We can not expect perfect government.

♦  Substantial progress toward better things can rarely be taken without developing new evils requiring new remedies.

♦  I hate politics.

♦  Presidents come and go but the Supreme Court goes on forever.

♦  No tendency is quite so strong in human nature as the desire to lay down rules of conduct for other people.

 

 

 

Quotes about the Presidency

Johnson_headPM

Here are some quotes about the Presidency — from those in the know:

No man will ever bring out of that office the reputation that carried him into it. The honeymoon would be as short in that case as in any other, and its moments of ectasy would be ransomed by years of torment and hatred.
Thomas Jefferson

 Presidents are selected not elected.
Franklin D. Roosevelt

No man who ever held the office of president would congratulate a friend on obtaining it.
John Adams

But there are advantages to being elected President. The day after I was elected, I had my high school grades classified Top Secret.
Ronald Reagan

I once told Nixon that the Presidency is like being a jackass caught in a hail storm. You've got to just stand there and take it.
Lyndon B. Johnson

I'll be damned if I am not getting tired of this.  It seems to be the profession of a President simply to hear other people talk.
William Howard Taft